PAKISTAN TRAVEL GUIDE

INTRODUCTION TO PAKISTAN

A journey through Pakistan is a fascinating encounter with a country that has withstood countless invasions, absorbed the culture and ethos of its conquerors and preserved their essence in monuments and archaeological heritage.

 

Pakistan fosters a five-thousand-year-old civilisation, remnants of which can still be seen in the ruins of Mohenjo Daro and Harappa. The land was an important stop on the trade route from Central Asia into India and across to China. Over the Khyber Pass, Kurram Pass, Bolan Pass and the Khunjerab Pass, caravans laden with dried fruits, silk, wool and precious stones laboured to their final destinations. If you are seeking adventure, want to lose yourself in nature's wonders, looking for some cultural stimulation or just want to intermingle with the incredibly warm and hospitable people, visit Pakistan and take back lingering memories of a country of diverse landscapes and people.

 

Certain areas in the tribal regions and the Afghanistan-Pakistan border are considered active war zones by the Pakistani military and therefore will not be accessible to both locals and foreigners. Do not try to illegally get into these areas as this could turn out to be fatal or may result in kidnapping for ransom. Make sure to obtain up to date information before you leave.

PAKISTAN COVID-19 TRAVEL STATUS

Updated:

Pakistan is now accepting flights at all international airports except Gwadar and Turbat. Travelers entering Pakistan must provide contact information through the PassTrack mobile app or an accessible web-based form, undergo screening by a health official, provide a certificate of negative COVID-19 RT-PCR test, fill a health declaration form on arrival and will be subject to thermal screening on arrival.Entry restrictionsPakistan has opened its airports to international flights, with the exceptions of Gwadar (GWD) and Turbat (TUK).Entry requirementsTravelers entering Pakistan must provide contact information through the PassTrack mobile app or an accessible web-based form, undergo screening by a health official, provide a certificate of negative COVID-19 RT-PCR test, fill a health declaration form on arrival and will be subject to thermal screening on arrival.From October 5, all International travelers are required to present evidence of a negative COVID-19 RT-PCR test taken within 96 hours of the travel date. However, there is a list of countries exempted from the mandatory test requirement.Children under the age of 12 and disabled travelers are exempt from the Covid-19 test requirement and Pass Track App requirement but required to complete a health declaration form upon arrival.Quarantine requirementsTravelers who have any symptoms of COVID-19 (including fever, cough, and breathing difficulty) will be allowed to proceed to their destination but will be required to have a COVID-19 test within 48 hours of arrival and submit the results of the test to the authorities. If the test is positive they will have to self-isolate in line with Pakistan’s guidelines.International travelers should self-isolate for 10 days after arrival (including those who are asymptomatic on arrival).There are currently 26,538 active cases of COVID-19 diagnosed in Pakistan and 7,141 deaths as of Nov 15 2020 https://pk.usembassy.gov/covid-19-information/https://www.gov.uk/foreign-travel-advice/pakistan/entry-requirements

 
 

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PAKISTAN QUICK FACTS

  • Capital: Islamabad
  • Government: Islamic Federal Republic
  • Currency: Rs. Pakistani rupee (PKR)
  • Area: 881,913 km²
  • Population: 212,2 million (2018)
  • Religion: Muslim 97%, Hindu, Christian, Buddhist, Sikhs and others 3%
  • Electricity: 230V, 50Hz (Europlug & old British Plug)
 

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PAKISTAN PUBLIC HOLIDAYS

  • 5 February, Kashmir Solidarity Day
  • 23 March, Republic Day (Pakistan Day)
  • 1 May, Labour Day
  • 1 July, Bank Holiday*
  • 14 August, Independence Day
  • 6 September, Defense of Pakistan Day
  • 11 September, Anniversary of the Death of Qaid-i-Azam
  • 9 November, Birthday of Allama Iqbal
  • 25 December, Qaid-i-Azam’s Birthday

* Check for actual date of observance.

Business openings and work schedules may be significantly affected by Christian, Buddhist, Hindu, Islamic, Jain, and Sikh holidays and

festivals.

 
 

PAKISTAN WEATHER SYNOPSIS

Pakistan lies in a temperate zone and its climate is as varied as the country’s topography—generally dry and hot near the coast and along the lowland plains of the Indus River, and becoming progressively cooler in the northern uplands and Himalayas. Four seasons are recognised: 1) a cool, dry winter from December to February; 2) a hot, dry spring from March through May; 3) the summer rainy season, also known as the southwest monsoon period, occurring from June to September; and 4) the retreating monsoons from October to November. A majority of the country receives very little rainfall, with the exception of the Northern regions, where monsoons can bring upwards of 200 mm a month from July to September. Inter-annual rainfall varies significantly, often leading to successive patterns of floods and drought. El Niño is a significant influence on climate variability in Pakistan, with anomalies in both, temperature and flood frequency and impact correlated with the El Niño cycle.

 
 
 

HEALTH RISKS IN PAKISTAN

Be aware of possible health risks in 

Pakistan

Malaria - Malaria is a serious and sometimes fatal disease caused by a parasite that commonly infects a certain type of mosquito which feeds on humans. People who get malaria are typically very sick with high fevers, shaking chills, and flu-like illness. Although malaria can be a deadly disease, illness and death from malaria can usually be prevented.

For the latest travel health notices and recommended precautions click

 
 
 
 
 
 
 

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